Journey To The Hoh Rainforest

Catching up on my never ending backlog of negatives waiting to be scanned and edited over the weekend, I was finally able to see some of my photographs created last October on a day trip out to the Hoh Rain Forest in the Olympic National Park. In a perfect world my workflow would be as such that I’d be able to shoot, develop, and edit in about a week or two turn around. Truth is, I’m always several months… well over a year in some cases, behind in my work. As daunting as this backlog feels at times, I do actually find enjoyment in the break between the moment I create an image and when I actually see it. The lack of instant gratification allows me to enjoy the moment with the camera in my hand, not stressing over whether or not I got the shot just right. Though it would be untrue for me to say that I do not care how my photographs turn out, I simply don’t view the finished image to be any more important than the effort taken to create it.

The day trip to the H0h with my friends Jana and Yani exemplifies the notion that the journey is often just as enjoyable as the final destination. Our 8 hour journey there and back dwarfed the few hours we actually spent within the ancient forest. So, instead of sharing some of the images I made once we reached our destination, I thought I’d highlight the trek itself:

We woke before dawn, wanting to get an early start on our 4 hour drive to the Olympic National Park. The trip began in downtown Seattle with a ferry ride across the Puget Sound.

Camera: Zero Image 2000 PinholeFilm: Kodak Ektar 100Location: Ferry Boat - Puget Sound, Washington Sate

Camera: Zero Image 2000 Pinhole
Film: Kodak Ektar 100
Location: Ferry Boat – Puget Sound, Washington Sate

We filled the time in the car conversing about this and that, and of course I utilized the opportunity to take a few pinhole exposures within the moving car.

Camera: Zero Image 2000 PinholeFilm: Kodak Ektar 100Location: Driving along Lake Crescent on the US-101 - Washington State

Camera: Zero Image 2000 Pinhole
Film: Kodak Ektar 100
Location: Driving along Lake Crescent on the US101 – Washington State

No Journey to the Olympic Peninsula would be complete without a pit-stop at one of the many turnouts along US101 as it winds around Lake Crescent.

Camera: Zero Image 2000 PinholeFilm: Kodak Ektar 100Location: Lake Crescent, Washington State

Camera: Zero Image 2000 Pinhole
Film: Kodak Ektar 100
Location: Lake Crescent, Washington State

After several hours, and many laughs we finally entered the Olympic National Park. This final image was taken as we traveled deeper into the forest along the tree lined Hoh Valley Road. The fall colors where simply stunning.

Camera: Pentax K1000Film: Western Family Color 200Location: Hoh Valley Road - Olympic National Park, Washington State

Camera: Pentax K1000
Film: Western Family Color 200
Location: Hoh Valley Road – Olympic National Park, Washington State

Advertisements

About jsodphotography

Seattle based film photographer. Recording light through a pinhole, Holga, and various 35mm cameras.
This entry was posted in Adventures, Film Photography, Photogarphy, Pinhole and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

7 Responses to Journey To The Hoh Rainforest

  1. When I saw the photos they somehow looked familiar, and after reading the post – of course – it’s Pacific Northwest. Such a magical place (of only it didn’t rain as much)

    • Thanks so much for the kind comment. The PNW is an amazing place, I consider myself lucky to live here, even if it does rain quite a bit. I just try to remind myself that’s why its so lush and green.

  2. kiwiskan says:

    Well worth waiting for!

  3. Wonderful images, as always! 🙂
    I agree with you about the workflow, sometimes that can be frustrating, but my over all feeling is that I get a much “cleaner” look on my images when some time has gone and the memory from the photography moment is far behind.

    • ‘Cleaner’ is a great way to describe it actually. Allowing, or perhaps forcing, yourself to not too see the images until a fair amount of time has passed allows you to clear your head of the moment you where in while creating the image. This lets you be much more objective towards your work, in theory anyway.

  4. jesusjoglar says:

    I am a really bad writer and I always read your post with interest because, usually, I find myself reflected in your way of thinking. Not only that, but I also go back in time to my youth remembering the hiking outing with my friends into the Parque Nacional de los Picos de Europa (the first of the Spanish National Parks).
    All that said, I can only say that the pictures of your post are outstanding and, although I have seen one or two before in your Flickr gallery, I like a lot the two “new” ones; the first has a wonderful composition/framing, and the color of third one is beautiful.

    • Thanks so much for the kind words. I’m always flattered when anyone thinks my writing is of any worth. the words do not always flow out of me, but I enjoy the process of writing (or typing rather) out my thoughts on photography and the adventures I have creating it. I consider it just as much a part of my workflow process, as holding the camera itself.

      Picos de Europa National Park looks like quite an amazing place, one certainly worthy of National Park status. If I ever make it over to Europe I’d like to explore some of its natural beauty as well as the urban cities.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s