The Serene Silence Of A Snow Covered Forest

Camera: holga 120NFilm: Kodak Ektar 100Location: Mountain Loop Highway, Washington State

Camera: holga 120N
Film: Kodak Ektar 100
Location: Mountain Loop Highway, Washington State

It has yet to snow in Seattle this winter, but its been mighty cold enough lately. Thankfully the clear sunny skies have prevented such an occurrence. Don’t get me wrong, I like snow, I’d just prefer it to be on my own terms. Meaning in the mountains, and not the city where it makes daily life a pain.

This image was made last January, when I made the drive out to the Mountain Loop Highway for an afternoon hike along the Old Sauk River Trail. Perhaps the recent snow scared people away, as I had the entire forest to myself. Only the soft crunch of my boots on the snow (and at times the rushing sounds of the Sauk River) broke the serene silence of the slumbering forest of old growth Douglas Fir.

Happy Tree Tuesday everyone!

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Posted in Film Photography, Holga, Photogarphy, Tree Tuesday | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 11 Comments

Oh-han-ə-pi-kosh – Standing At The Edge

Camera: Holga 120WPCFilm: Kodak Ektar 100

Camera: Holga 120WPC
Film: Kodak Ektar 100

Ohanapecosh is located in the southest corner of Mount Rainier National Park and is named for a Taidnapam (Upper Cowlitz) Indian habitation site along the river. The term is believed to mean ‘standing at the edge’. I figured it made a fitting title to this photograph, considering I made it while standing at the edge an embankment above the Ohanapecosh River.

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The Spirit of the 12th Man

Camera: Zero Image 2000 PinholeFilm: Fuji Neopan 100 Acros

Camera: Zero Image 2000 Pinhole
Film: Fuji Neopan 100 Acros

Recently fellow photographer and blogger Jack Lowe, wrote a post about the collective pulse of a crowd at a sporting event, or as Jack more eloquently described it the ‘city’s beating heart’.  Although his sport is soccer, and mine football, fan rituals on game day are much the same. Fans arrive early congregating in the bars and restaurants near the stadium before the game, eventually piling through the turnstiles, and finding their seats by kickoff where their combined voices echo throughout the game.

This weekend the Seattle Seahawks of the National Football League will play the Atlanta Falcons in the NFC Divisional Round of the playoffs. The city is a buzz with excitement over the prospects of reaching the Super Bowl. Proud that our collective voice as the 12th man, the leagues best and loudest fans, helped the Seahawks achieve an 8-0 regular season home record.

Sports stadiums are one of my favorite places to capture with a pinhole camera. Their ability to capture an extreme wide angle allows you to easily encompass nearly the entire stadium in a single exposure. I made this image by using a miniature tripod to carefully place my pinhole camera in the cup holder in front of me, opening the shutter for 1 minute.

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Paradigm Shift

Camera: Zero Image 2000 PinholeFilm: Kodak Ektar 100

Camera: Zero Image 2000 Pinhole
Film: Kodak Ektar 100

Vertically challenged trees, simply shift their focus and stretch out horizontally.

Happy Tree Tuesday everyone!

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At The Edge Of The Continent

Camera: Holga 120NFilm: Ilford Pan F Plus 50Location: First Beach - La Push, Washington State

Camera: Holga 120N
Film: Ilford Pan F Plus 50
Location: First Beach – La Push, Washington State

I’ve been experimenting lately with multiple exposure panoramic photographs. These in-camera creations, often referred to as a Holgaramas, allow one to interpret a landscape in ways a single photograph could not. The key is to layer your exposures in such a way that their results do not look like a jumbled mess. No easy task of course. If you’d like to see more examples of Holgaramas, head on over to Dog Dreamzzz Flickr page. Her work has had a great influence on my own work.

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Capturing The Japanese Garden With A Pinhole Camera

One of the great advantages of shooting with a wooden Zero Image pinhole camera is that its small, well built design allows me to take it places I couldn’t, or wouldn’t dare venture with my other cameras. comprised of nothing more than a simple box with a hole in the center, there really isn’t much I can do to hinder its ability to create images. Trust me I’ve tried, so far I’ve managed to drop it in a river, have a bum kick it, and let it tumble down more than a few flight of stairs. So when the staff at the Seattle Parks and Recreation’s Japanese Public Garden informed me I couldn’t use a tripod I simply adapted my approach.

Tripods are usually a required tool in any pinhole photographers kit, as the required long exposures make steadying the camera a must. Yet, it is possible to survive without them. The key is to search for flat surfaces to steady the camera on. At first this seems like a painful disadvantage, after awhile though, you begin to realize this restriction actually opens up a world of possibilities unavailable to more advanced cameras.

This first image of the Shoseian Teahouse for example, was the result of pushing my pinhole camera through thick hedges to strategically place it in an area that was otherwise off limits.

Camera: Zero Image 2000 PinholeFilm: Kodak Ektar 100

Camera: Zero Image 2000 Pinhole
Film: Kodak Ektar 100

Similarly the image below of a gnarled Japanese Maple tree, was made possibly only after I knelt down, dodging the low branches to place my pinhole camera near the base of the tree. Thought it might appear as if the camera isn’t all that close to the tree, due to a lack of a lens elongating the scene, it is in fact quite close. You’d be hard pressed to capture this tree, at such a wide angle, with even the widest of lens on another camera. Even better, unlike a fish-eye lens which distorts straight lines and bends the outer reaches of the frame, a pinhole does not suffer such affects. The Zero Image 2000 really is a magically little wooden box.

Camera: Zero Image 2000 PinholeFilm: Kodak Ektar 100

Camera: Zero Image 2000 Pinhole
Film: Kodak Ektar 100

Posted in Adventures, Film Photography, Photogarphy, Pinhole | Tagged , , , , , , , , | 14 Comments

Merry Christmas

Camera: Zero Image 2000 PinholeFilm: Kodak Portra 400

Camera: Zero Image 2000 Pinhole
Film: Kodak Portra 400

Merry Christmas everyone. A slightly different spin, pun intended, on Tree Tuesday. Your eyes do not deceive you, that is in fact a rotating Christmas tree. A novelty that I am not sure ever really caught on, as I’ve never seen or heard of anyone else having one. My parents do though. I can remember when they brought it home when I was a kid, my mom proclaiming that ‘we can now enjoy all the Christmas ornaments!’ That’s right, no more hiding the ugly ones in the back of the tree for this family! Sure its was a bit weird at first having a rotating tree, but its really grown on me over the years.

Happy Tree Tuesday, a weekly celebration of trees. Feel free to join in on the celebration, the more the merrier. 

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The Picture Files

Camera: Hasselblad 500cFilm: Fuji Neopan 100 AcrosLocation: Central Library - Seattle, Washington

Camera: Hasselblad 500c
Film: Fuji Neopan 100 Acros
Location: Central Library – Seattle, Washington

During my most recent photographic adventure inside the Seattle Central Library I discovered the picture files. Talk about a diamond in the rough, several rows of unassuming filling cabinets filled to the brim with magazine and newspaper image clippings. An image of just about anything can be found within them. You can count me as one of the merely curious. A return trip to explore this cornucopia of images is certainly in order.

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The Whimsical Nature Of A Coastal Forest

Camera: Holga 120NFilm: Kodak Ektar 100Location: Kalaloch - Olympic National Park, Washington State

Camera: Holga 120N
Film: Kodak Ektar 100
Location: Kalaloch – Olympic National Park, Washington State

This tanglement of trees resides on the fringes of the coastal forest, where they mingle daily with the sand and driftwood of the beach.

Happy Tree Tuesday everyone!

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Journey To The Hoh Rainforest

Catching up on my never ending backlog of negatives waiting to be scanned and edited over the weekend, I was finally able to see some of my photographs created last October on a day trip out to the Hoh Rain Forest in the Olympic National Park. In a perfect world my workflow would be as such that I’d be able to shoot, develop, and edit in about a week or two turn around. Truth is, I’m always several months… well over a year in some cases, behind in my work. As daunting as this backlog feels at times, I do actually find enjoyment in the break between the moment I create an image and when I actually see it. The lack of instant gratification allows me to enjoy the moment with the camera in my hand, not stressing over whether or not I got the shot just right. Though it would be untrue for me to say that I do not care how my photographs turn out, I simply don’t view the finished image to be any more important than the effort taken to create it.

The day trip to the H0h with my friends Jana and Yani exemplifies the notion that the journey is often just as enjoyable as the final destination. Our 8 hour journey there and back dwarfed the few hours we actually spent within the ancient forest. So, instead of sharing some of the images I made once we reached our destination, I thought I’d highlight the trek itself:

We woke before dawn, wanting to get an early start on our 4 hour drive to the Olympic National Park. The trip began in downtown Seattle with a ferry ride across the Puget Sound.

Camera: Zero Image 2000 PinholeFilm: Kodak Ektar 100Location: Ferry Boat - Puget Sound, Washington Sate

Camera: Zero Image 2000 Pinhole
Film: Kodak Ektar 100
Location: Ferry Boat – Puget Sound, Washington Sate

We filled the time in the car conversing about this and that, and of course I utilized the opportunity to take a few pinhole exposures within the moving car.

Camera: Zero Image 2000 PinholeFilm: Kodak Ektar 100Location: Driving along Lake Crescent on the US-101 - Washington State

Camera: Zero Image 2000 Pinhole
Film: Kodak Ektar 100
Location: Driving along Lake Crescent on the US101 – Washington State

No Journey to the Olympic Peninsula would be complete without a pit-stop at one of the many turnouts along US101 as it winds around Lake Crescent.

Camera: Zero Image 2000 PinholeFilm: Kodak Ektar 100Location: Lake Crescent, Washington State

Camera: Zero Image 2000 Pinhole
Film: Kodak Ektar 100
Location: Lake Crescent, Washington State

After several hours, and many laughs we finally entered the Olympic National Park. This final image was taken as we traveled deeper into the forest along the tree lined Hoh Valley Road. The fall colors where simply stunning.

Camera: Pentax K1000Film: Western Family Color 200Location: Hoh Valley Road - Olympic National Park, Washington State

Camera: Pentax K1000
Film: Western Family Color 200
Location: Hoh Valley Road – Olympic National Park, Washington State

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